Have you ever received one of these bogus tech support calls?  The fraudster calls claiming to be from technical support at Microsoft, Apple, or other well-known companies. They say that they’ve detected viruses or malware on your computer to trick you into paying for software you don’t need or worse yet, convince you to give them remote access to your computer to fix the problem.

These fraudsters take advantage of your concerns about viruses and other threats.  They know most computer users have heard over and over that it’s important to install and maintain security software.  But the purpose behind this elaborate scam isn’t to protect you and your computer; it’s to make money.

Once they have gained your trust, they may:

  • Ask you to give them remote access to your computer and then make changes to your settings that could leave your computer vulnerable.
  • Try to enroll you in worthless computer maintenance or warranty program.
  • Ask for credit card information so they can bill you for phony services – or services you could get elsewhere for free.
  • Trick you into installing malware that could steal sensitive data, like user names and passwords to online financial sites, your email account, and more.
  • Direct you to websites and ask you to enter your credit card number and other personal information.

Regardless of the tactics they use, they have one purpose; it’s to make money.

If you get one of these calls, HANG UP!  Microsoft, Apple or any other company will not call you proactively in this way. The caller will likely try to create a sense of urgency or use high-pressure tactics to get you to do what they want; Just Hang Up!

If you believe you may have been a victim of one of these scam calls, don’t panic.  Instead:

  • Unplug your computer from the internet.
  • Take your computer to a local reputable business that specializes in fixing computers; let them know what happened.
  • Once your computer has been repaired, or via another computer/device, change your passwords on all online financial and email sites you use and any other passwords you gave out.
  • If you paid for bogus services with a credit card, call your credit card provider and ask to reverse the charges.  Check your statements for any other charge’s you didn’t make, and ask to reverse those too.

Check back for more information on the next Mercantile Bank Security Minute.