Have you ever received one of these bogus tech support calls?  The fraudster calls claiming to be from technical support at Microsoft, Apple, or other well-known companies. They say that they’ve detected viruses or malware on your computer to trick you into paying for software you don’t need or worse yet, convince you to give them remote access to your computer to fix the problem.

These fraudsters take advantage of your concerns about viruses and other threats.  They know most computer users have heard over and over that it’s important to install and maintain security software.  But the purpose behind this elaborate scam isn’t to protect you and your computer; it’s to make money.

Once they have gained your trust, they may:

  • Ask you to give them remote access to your computer and then make changes to your settings that could leave your computer vulnerable.
  • Try to enroll you in worthless computer maintenance or warranty program.
  • Ask for credit card information so they can bill you for phony services – or services you could get elsewhere for free.
  • Trick you into installing malware that could steal sensitive data, like user names and passwords to online financial sites, your email account, and more.
  • Direct you to websites and ask you to enter your credit card number and other personal information.

Regardless of the tactics they use, they have one purpose; it’s to make money.

If you get one of these calls, HANG UP!  Microsoft, Apple or any other company will not call you proactively in this way. The caller will likely try to create a sense of urgency or use high-pressure tactics to get you to do what they want; Just Hang Up!

If you believe you may have been a victim of one of these scam calls, don’t panic.  Instead:

  • Unplug your computer from the internet.
  • Take your computer to a local reputable business that specializes in fixing computers; let them know what happened.
  • Once your computer has been repaired, or via another computer/device, change your passwords on all online financial and email sites you use and any other passwords you gave out.
  • If you paid for bogus services with a credit card, call your credit card provider and ask to reverse the charges.  Check your statements for any other charge’s you didn’t make, and ask to reverse those too.

Check back for more information on the next Mercantile Bank Security Minute.

Article Written By: Kyle Kunnen | SVP, Information Security Officer | Mercantile Bank of Michigan

If you are like me, once everyone is home for the evening, I go around and lock all the doors and make sure the two by four is in the track of the slider door.  As an added security measure we have motion sensors on some large outdoor lights.  Your computer is like your home and there are numerous ways you can protect it from intruders too.

A firewall is a definite must have if you connect your computer to the internet.  Not only ensure you have one, but also make sure the default administration password has been changed.  The default password on a lot of home systems is “password” and everyone knows this, especially those with malicious intent.  Change it to something only you know.  If you need to write it down, be sure to store it in a safe place.

I recommend you find someone who knows a thing or two about in home firewalls and seek their advice on the best way to configure your solution.  Below are some additional items to consider for improving security for your computer:

  • Endpoint Protection – This is a new term describing the next generation of Anti-Malware software.  Make sure you have one running on your computer.  There are many commercially available solutions.
  • Auto Updates – You need to ensure your Endpoint Protection, Operating System and other software applications remain updated with the latest security patches provided by the vendor.  The most convenient way to do this is using the auto update features built into these solutions.
  • Screen Saver Lock – By setting up a password for your computer and enabling the screen saver lock, you keep information on your computer safe.  It also provides you control over who you allow to utilize your computer and when.